Exhibition

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c3 March 2020 Exhibition

When

Opening:
Wednesday 4 March,
6–8pm

Exhibition:
4 – 29 March 2020
Wednesday to Sunday,
10am – 5pm

Where

c3 Contemporary Art Space
Convent building

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When

Opening:
Wednesday 4 March,
6–8pm

Exhibition:
4 – 29 March 2020
Wednesday to Sunday,
10am – 5pm

Where

c3 Contemporary Art Space
Convent building

Follow

FacebookInstagram

Contact Details

Email

Gallery 1

Between Days
Ella Dunn

I began making this body of work after moving to a new area in the Northern suburbs of Melbourne. Although similar in many ways to the neighbouring suburb I moved from, I quickly began to notice distinct local nuances and experiences as I viewed my environment with fresh eyes. Lemon trees abundant with fruit hanging low over fences, a proud cat gang strutting down the street, and riding my bike through the silent streets, arms outstretched in the balmy night air. These stories keep us awake and keep us in the present.

Ella Dunn’s art practice is focused on narrative-based, figurative works. Through the medium of paint, Dunn explores her world of the everyday.

Gallery 2

Seen
Julia Stewart and Cameron Gill

Julia Stewart and Cameron Gill are interested in the challenges and subtleties that emerge in painting ‘from life’. While photography can act as an excellent aid to painters, there are pitfalls. In painting from photos, an artist can readily get caught up in merely reproducing all, or parts of, the image as it appears in the photograph. Stewart and Gill would like to explore the capacity for a painting to signify space, in order to transport the viewer into the intimate, subjective space that a painter creates when making an image.

Gallery 3

Collision
Penny Walker-Keefe and Lewis O’Brien

In 2009 news circulated that a bird had dropped a piece of baguette into the Large Hadron Collider (LHC), also called an atom smasher, at the European Organisation for Nuclear Research (CERN), causing it to overheat. CERN confirmed some bread and feathers were discovered in an electrical substation above the LHC but suggested journalists were quick to invent an unlikely story. This anecdote sparked a conversation about particles and bread. Could you accelerate two bread rolls fast enough to create a collision? Would a wormhole to a bakery be opened or a new flaky particle discovered? This video work is the product of hours of Mythbusters-style engineering and backyard experimentation to collide baguettes with spectacular results.

Gallery 4

Reworked
Isabella Darcy

Reworked by Melbourne-based artist Isabella Darcy is an on-going project and investigation into the material processes of twenty-first century shopping. The project explores the connections between material culture, art and fashion. Mainly working with found and discarded objects and clothing, particularly denim, Darcy acknowledges the pre-existing lives of materials. The works in Reworked take on different art-making methods with materials such as cutting, bleaching, sewing and photographic screen-printing. Each work of Darcy’s gestural and handmade aesthetics is a comment on the nature of process and production in fashion, mixed-media and art-making.

Gallery 5

Cognitive AI Juice Bar
Lewis Doherty

Cognitive AI Juice Bar is an enquiry into the nature of human-computer interaction: from the benign to the more overtly disruptive elements of the tech industry. The often semi-abstract images and installations that make up the show look to force the viewer to question how they use technology and the language they use to account for it. In doing this, the work provokes us into a more creative yet quizzical interpretation of what we consider to be commonplace features of communication, labour or entertainment and asks that we consider our relationship to objects as we would our relationships to other people. The exhibitions takes its title from a Microsoft Azure activation that attempted to assign the ideal juice to conference delegates based on their reaction to a series of images.

Gallery 6

Futile Devices
Maddy Anderson and Jack Martinich

The exhibition Futile Devices acts as a platform to unravel different communication methods, including that between humans and machines. The project presents a drawing machine which uses technologies to create hand drawn notes into fleeting sketches of light. A magic trick, a sleight of hand: the machine will act as a ghostly translator, revealing a journal full of incomplete projects and unattempted ideas.